Put the streets on a diet

Further to “Constructive’s” idea that we list city services and expenses that could be cut, let’s address the width of our streets.

The city forces developers to build unnecessarily wide streets that eventually get re-striped and effectively get made narrower to traffic.

Among other deleterious effects:

  • Less land gets sold to homeowners and thus fewer homes are built on the land.  These lost homes would be paying property taxes to our local governments.
  • The wide streets eventually have to be repaved.  It costs more to repave a wide street than a narrow one.
  • Housing becomes less dense thus increasing the cost of public services because of the extra distances that have to be traveled.
  • The city has to paint more lines on the street in order to “calm” traffic

We deserve better

Brutus

 

15 Responses to Put the streets on a diet

  1. Anonymous says:

    I’m not sure if there is an “Argument” here concerning streets, REPAIRS. The ONLY streets that get REPAIRED, maintained, are the ones the State maintains, “TX DOT”. In El Taxo, they charge an EXTRA $10 for vehicle registration. Supposedly that is to “Maintain” city streets. Apparently the money goes to buy a new pop corn machine, hot dog cooker, beer cooler at the ball park. Maybe the water bill at one of the “Tourista attraction” splash pools, maintaining the lawn at the golf courses? Where are CITY streets “Maintained”.?? Cracks, pot holes, NO lane markings, NO turn lanes, few street lights, except DOWNTOWN, the BALL PARK. Bad visibility on BLACK, unmarked streets at night, stormy weather. The CITY is RESPONSIBILE for the MAJORITY of traffic accidents, fatalities on the streets. Maybe if they made ANY effort to collect the MILLIONS$$$$ in UNPAID traffic tickets……………??

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    • More Anonymous says:

      If TxDOT had been properly maintaining Mesa, it would not be crumbling and we would not be looking at total chaos on Mesa when they start the major reconstruction of Mesa this coming year.

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  2. Ticked off taxpayer says:

    This is pure bs, Brutus propagated by idiots from Smart Growth California and builders who make more money if they can build out every inch of land. We have tons of land here but we are already packing folks on postage stamp size lots to tightly pack houses. Look at our demographics: 85% Hispanic. Hispanics are family oriented and because the Catholic Church frowns on birth control tend to have large families. So what does that translate to in terms of single-family dwelling neighborhoods? First, there are likely to be more kids playing. There are also more family gatherings. Houses are crowded so the garage often ends up storing stuff rather than cars. Since lots are already small, it means people park their cars in front of their houses on a daily basis. It also means that when extended family comes over there are more cars and the streets are likely to also have kids riding bikes and other stuff. Narrowing the streets creates hazards when you factor in the parked cars and kids. And packing houses together tightly means kids have to either go to a city park or play in the streets because backyards and green space in the neighborhood are nonexistent. In short, Smart Growth mentality forces families to depend on the government more for entertainment and that costs as much as urban sprawl when water parks and blinged out parks are factored in. But it is worst than that. I lived in Cali when the Berkeley Hills fire happened in the Bay Area. They had narrowed the streets. The problem was that between the abandoned parked cars on the street and the evacuating families in cars fleeing the fire, the fire engines couldn’t get to fire. They ended up forcing families to leave their cars and flee on foot so the fire equipment could get there. Lots more property damage and panic than was necessary because of narrow streets. Our streets are fine and adequate in the event that emergency equipment needs to go in one direction while a mass of vehicles head in the other direction. It is time we recognize that El Pasoans’ lifestyles don’t always fit the progressive model of packing folks into tiny houses on zero clearance lots served by mass transit. Fewer houses and wider streets create neighborhoods that are safer for families with kids. Builders make a ton of money and often brag about how cheap land is here when they talk among themselves. The only things making houses difficult to afford are builder greed, rising property taxes and a city leadership incapable of attracting employers with higher paying jobs.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    This is a ridiculous topic. The streets are already built, so discussing them is like discussing the downtown sidewalks being too thick. There is no possible solution, and the discussion would be subjective at best. There is no ideal street width, some would way wider is better, others narrow.

    Discuss the socialism encroaching into the El Paso way of life, Komrade.

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    • More Anonymous says:

      You’re right. Let’s discuss socialism in El Paso. I am tired of my tax dollars going to a small group of wealthy businessmen who always say they can’t justify spending their investments without taxpayer subsidies. If you’re really concerned about socialism, step up and go toe to toe with Hunt, Foster and Margo.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You are preaching to the choir. I was against the city giveaways to people like Foster/Hunt from day one. Foster never should have received subsidies for the Fountains, either.

        Making taxpayers subsidize the business and hobbies of the wealthiest people in El Paso should be prosecutable. City council is trying hard to give them a stadium. If they can’t afford the teams they shouldn’t buy them, it isn’t the taxpayer’s responsibility to provide a “home” for their hobby teams.

        Besides, they do NOTHING for the taxpayers in the city. There is literally zero benefit to having a minor league baseball or soccer team, other than the incessant calls to buy tickets to give away. What happened to sold-out stadiums?

        Next they’ll be giving free tickets to students like the Diablos did for years just to get people to watch.

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  4. John Dungan says:

    Yeah, socialism is killing us. I think somebody doesn’t have a clue as to what true socialism would be. Meanwhile, Brutus, I do not think this idea about narrowing the streets will hold up. For one thing, let’s be honest, folks. Fewer people today can afford to live in a house, so all of the issues discussed here become moot. That said, I would point out that I grew up in a city with very narrow streets, and that just won’t do. With cars parked on both sides of the street, there is only room for traffic to go in one direction at a time.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ticked off taxpayer says:

    The reality is more streets are getting built all the time, because builders are continuing to build new developments (and destroy open space) because the land is cheap. They are the ones lobbying for narrower streets because it lines their pockets. The end result of letting builders drive our regional planning is that schools are losing enrollment as folks leave old neighborhoods for new neighborhoods and roads not meant for high density housing are getting overcongested. We aren’t growing as a community significantly so we are just moving people around plus attracting some investment from Mexico. Eventually, we’ll have an excess housing issue like Houston and San Antonio are seeing and all property values will drop until the surplus in new construction balances out. If City Council thinks tax revenue is flat now, wait until that happens.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. More Anonymous says:

    This sounds like a developer talking. When I drive through the newer cookie cutter developments on the westside, the streets are so narrow that you almost hate to meet another car on a curve. If cars are parked on the street, it gets particularly precarious.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Good design is very important. More important is voter turnout. Expand the electorate, recruit progressive candidates, make positive steps to create a more inclusive environment. It can be done.
    I have discussed El Paso politics with friends in other cities and they find hard to believe that people don’t fight for their rights here. People make the place. They say things like, “ if that would happen here the electorate wouldn’t tolerate it”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ticked off taxpayer says:

      Anonymous, we have progressive candidates. That is our biggest problem. What everyone loses sight of is that there are two agendas in EP. We have a political class of wanna be career politicians who lean socialist and want to turn us into Portland or LA. Our local rich guys fuel that agenda (even though they are likely Republicans) because the progressives’ build it and they will come agenda lines their pockets with money for their construction companies and economic incentives that take all the risk out of their business ventures. The political agenda is socialist and designed to drive increasing dependence on government. Why not narrow streets? When self driving cars become mainstream we’ll all abandon car ownership and order ride share. If that doesn’t happen fast enough, let’s ban or tax the hell out of cars because the streets are too narrow. And we need to keep expanding a bus service no one rides because someday that will be their only other option. Meanwhile big donors line up to lock in their ownership of the self driving cab companies. That’s how progressives think and why donors fund their candidacy. In their dream world the average person owns very little property and has very little say in how they live their lives. They work and get to keep whatever the government allows them to keep. And the government slowly herds them into those mindsets through initiatives like smart growth that limit their housing choices in the name of ending urban sprawl. By time most of the folks around here figure out just how idiotic these plans are it is too late. Just remember Vero co-sponsored Green New Deal.

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  8. Real estate Listings

    Put the streets on a diet | elpasospeak

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  9. good Coachi says:

    good Coachi

    Put the streets on a diet | elpasospeak

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  10. Energy Transition

    Put the streets on a diet | elpasospeak

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