Learning to speak

This came in from a loyal reader the other day:

Brutus

12 Responses to Learning to speak

  1. Concerned Taxpayer says:

    Are you serious? The argument is against electronic devices in young kids. We are not talking about adults. We are not even talking about teenagers. There have been plenty of studies that have shown these devices can affect kids ability to recognize emotions. In addition, it is proven they can affect academic achievement. There are more negative effects, but I am sure you are fully aware of the research. You just decide to ignore it and use only the ones that fit your agenda.

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  2. Al says:

    We do read A White Man’s Burden in high schools today, to point out historical racism.

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  3. old gringo says:

    Has anyone stopped to think how much easier it would be for the child if they could read (in English) before they enter 1st grade? Personally, I don’t think there is any reason for a 6, 7, or 8 year old to have an electronic device before they are capable of reading. Is this borne out in the reading scores? I think so.

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  4. abandon hope says:

    Having just spent time with an 11-year old technologically advanced boy, I am amazed at his verbal as well as computer skills. If you want to get children talking, just ask them to explain the game they play on their device. Ask them about the characters and the plot. My experience has been that verbal ability does not suffer as children become technologically advanced. But time on devices needs to be balanced with play in the physical world – individual or groups sports, walking, bicycling, board games, etc.

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  5. Tim Holt says:

    And everyone looking at the above blog entry is using a screen to see it. And everyone that responds will be using a screen to do so.

    I was always amused by EPT columnist Ramath Subramanian’s almost bi-monthly rants against technology, how it was destroying our children, how it was not needed, how he wished for education like his childhood days in India, sitting in his one room schoolhouse, listening to the elephants outside and reading Kipling, while the monsoon rains beat a steady rhythm on the roof.

    Yet, everything he complained about he actually did in order to make his column. He had to have a computer to begin with, use a word processor to write it, use the internet to upload it to the Times, then the Times had to use pretty sophisticated software to edit it, post it, catalog it, archive it. Then his readers had to actually use technology to read his screeds about how bad technology was.

    It is easy to pick on technology, but try having El Paso Speak without it.

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    • JerryK says:

      He would never be allowed to read Kipling in an American school today. “The White Man’s Burden” is very un-PC.

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    • JimColt says:

      Maybe we would be better off.

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    • anonymous says:

      You’re response is a classic case of missing the point and arguing just to be arguing.

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    • anonymous says:

      How do you excuse EPISD’s terrible reading scores posted yesterday? Since you’re the insider and guru of all things education, why are they so bad?

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    • Concerned Taxpayer says:

      Are you serious? The argument is against electronic devices in young kids. We are not talking about adults. We are not even talking about teenagers. There have been plenty of studies that have shown these devices can affect kids ability to recognize emotions. In addition, it is proven they can affect academic achievement. There are more negative effects, but I am sure you are fully aware of the research. You just decide to ignore it and use only the ones that fit your agenda.

      Like

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