Being in charge

We’ve heard a lot about our president not heading the advice of the military in regard to the punishment of some members of the military.

Evidently some people think that the subordinates are in charge.

The president is the commander in chief.

Whether his decision was the right one or not he had the right to do what he did.

The next thing we know the privates will be telling the generals what to do.

We deserve better

Brutus

9 Responses to Being in charge

  1. Anonymous says:

    this is no different from workers thinking they should be running the company. the problem with the last few generations is that everyone thinks that because they feel a certain way they get to defy orders. anyone who supports that shouldn’t complain when they order fries and get celery instead.

    when you can rationalize bad behavior all things become possible.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ticked off taxpayer says:

    Trump’s logic was sound. Convicting a guy over a trophy photo when you let deserters and guys who leak classified info get much shorter sentences is crazy. My dad fought in the Korean War and served two tours in Vietnam. During the Calley trial we had a lot of conversations about what soldiers go through in wars where civilians may be the enemy—he talked about women carrying kids who blew up troops in Vietnam and how seeing that frequently really messed with soldier perspectives of right and wrong. He felt Calley crossed the line and needed to be prosecuted, but I think he would have felt this Seal was a victim of political correctness run amok. And the. the CiC is the last word. These comments combined with the State Dept employee comments in the impeachment farce show that we have a bureaucracy that has lost sight of its role in our government. The Constitution gives no power to unelected bureaucrats. In fact, the concept of bureaucracy didn’t exist at the time of its writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anonymous says:

      my first view of a dead body was in jr high school, our history teacher’s scrapbook from vietnam. they were posing with stacks of dead bodies. he and his friends were smiling or laughing in some of the photos. in war things are viewed through a different lens. body count was the difference between winning and losing, and to the soldier, not being in the stack was cause for celebration.

      Like

  3. Disgusted says:

    When we start to think it is okay for someone to pose with a corpse of someone they killed like a human corpse is a hunting trophy, we have lost our moral compass. It is also a violation of regulations and the Geneva Convention.

    Like

  4. Ticked off taxpayer says:

    And when your comrades in arms were killed by that corpse, it may be part of the grieving process. The enemies we fight aren’t Geneva Convention signatories. They do horrible things in the name of jihad. While it is important that our troops not sink to their level of burning folks alive, raping folks, beheading prisoners, using active hospitals and schools as military HQs or any of the other crap that is routinely happening with our war on extremists, occasionally blowing off steam posing with body of a guy who did do those kinds of things isn’t that big a deal. Like or not, it provides an outlet and some closure for folks that are seeing unimaginable horror all the time. If we don’t like it we should support bringing all troops home. Europe has already figured out this war isn’t winnable. We put them in hell and then complain when they aren’t 24/7 Boy Scouts.

    Like

  5. Anonymous says:

    he demonstrated his contempt for the rule of law, and his approval of war crimes. even if he you don’t give a fuck about morality, we are letting all our current and potential enemies we don’t abide by the geneva convention. obviously terrorists like isis don’t abide by it either. but if in the future we fight a legitimate government like russia, china, iran, etc they should go into the fight knowing that we don’t follow the geneva convention and thus they won’t either.

    Like

  6. good governance oxymoron says:

    Servicemen and women are entitled to the exact same Constitutional rights, protections, and due process as civilians.

    Facts matter and the President granted 3 pardons for 3 proven unjust and malicious prosecutions of 3 servicemen who were determined to be innocent after extensive review.

    1. For all 3 pardons there was irrefutable evidence of egregious prosecutorial misconduct by the Military Justice system prosecutors including:

    Spying on defense lawyers by embedding a tracking virus in an image on emails exchanged with defense attorneys allowing illegal monitoring of the defense strategy.

    Engaging in witness tampering to prevent testimony, tainting the jury pool through media leaks, and then conspiring to shield those crimes when the defense lawyers discovered and disclosed.

    Withholding crucial biometric evidence that proved innocence from defense lawyers.

    Pursuing a prosecution 10+ years after a Military Tribunal cleared one of all wrongdoing, and then incarcerating and preventing him from talking to his defense attorney.

    2. There is no offense called “war crimes” in the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

    By Geneva Convention standards – War crimes are planned and calculated to kill mass populations of innocent civilians, like the Holocaust.

    A split-second decision on the battlefield to kill an enemy combatant and save lives is not a war crime.

    Like

  7. John Dungan says:

    Amazing how everyone has an opinion, but none of y’all were present to have seen any real evidence one way or the other. I’d say that the only thing we ‘know’ for a fact is that he acted in a manner unprecedented in modern times.

    Like

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