EPISD telling stories

It seems that someone over at EPISD is having problems with arithmetic again.

The Times published this article back in June, 2018.  In it they listed elementary schools that the district was considering for closure.

Rivera elementary was shown to have 360 students putting it at 51 percent of capacity.

Then again

Back in March of 2015 the district published the Jacobs study (994 pages) of EPISD facilities.

In the study Jacobs tells us that Rivera has a permanent capacity (no portable classrooms) of 388 students.

That means that the school was at 93 percent of its capacity when the Times ran the article.

According to a October 10, 2018 report to the board the school has 331 students today (85%).

Even more concerning is that Polk elementary (eight tenths of a mile away from Rivera) has 700 students today in a school with a permanent capacity of 615.

They could transfer students from Polk to Rivera and Rivera would be at 100% of its capacity.

Then again it looks like the district just wants to close Rivera and is willing to publish inaccurate statistics to justify their plans.

We deserve better

Brutus

13 Responses to EPISD telling stories

  1. Anonymous says:

    The truth- Rivera would be full if Polk stopped stealing their students. Polk is only over capacity because they approve transfer and open enrollment requests in an effort to become a Title I campus, thus receiving more federal dollars for the ‘at-risk’ students they really only view as $$$ signs.

    Like

    • Wow! says:

      Maybe people choose Polk because they feel it is a better school.

      Like

      • Dan Wever says:

        Here you get a peek at what can happen with CHOICE, VOUCHERS and all the other things that can put a damper on Public Education. There will be some schools that are better than other schools and the people with money will get their kids in these schools because that will be the way the system is set up. Education reform is actually designed to keep the lower class citizens in their place, at the bottom of the food chain. 😦

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  2. John Hogan says:

    It wasn’t all that long ago that I was driving by there with my daughter who used to go there and was visiting from out of town. At that time it seemed that almost the whole school yard was overrun with portable classrooms.

    Like

  3. JerryK says:

    Rivera occupies prime commercial potential property, right across the street from that “new urbanism” complex. It wouldn’t surprise me if that was the deciding factor in a closure.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Wever says:

      JerryK, you are of course probably right except that a charter school in this neighborhood would sure be nice for the Charter school people!

      Like

  4. Anonymous says:

    Instead of writing articles about how the local school districts consistently misrepresent information in efforts to convince the taxpaying public to vote for more money every year, you should do an article about the time they might have been honest about something. We should forget that every year they spin their poor education agency ratings, poor performance, facilities neglect, etc. and instead focus on the one thing they seem to get right.

    There must be something they have been honest about that benefits students. The challenge would be to cover that elusive story.

    Liked by 1 person

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